Quantcast
Channel: The Young, Black, and Fabulous®
Viewing all articles
Browse latest Browse all 20702

Supermodel Beverly Johnson Speaks Out -- Bill Cosby Drugged Me!

0
0

 photo i1beverly-johnson-bill-cosby-opener_zps4db8e674.jpg

The outcry amongst women who accuse Bill Cosby of drugging and/or raping them continues.  And supermodel Beverly Johnson is the latest to come forward.

 

Check out her recount of allegedly being drugged by "America's Dad" back in the 80's...

As more and more women come forward with accusations of Bill Cosby sexually assaulting them, the comedic legend's empire appears to be crumbling before our eyes.  While all--except one that deals with a woman who was possibly underage--of the women's situations fall outside the statute of limitations to pursue justice in a court of law, it's not stopping them from telling their stories to the court of public opinion.

The count of women coming forward with allegations is now well over 20, and supermodel Beverly Johnson is the latest person to tell her shocking story.

In an essay written for Vanity Fair, the first African American woman to appear on the cover of American Vogue in 1974 is giving her first hand recount about a time she was on top of the modeling world. But she says it wasn't all champagne and photoshoots.  She alleges she was ALSO drugged by Bill Cosby during the 80's when she was attempting to break into the acting world.

While trying out for a small role on the hit sitcom "The Cosby Show" as one of Dr. Huxtable's pregnant patients, then-single mother Beverly says that Bill invited her to his home to go over lines one weekend.  And after taking one sip of the cappuccino he gave her, it was all over from there.

She writes;

Now let me explain this: I was a top model during the 70s, a period when drugs flowed at parties and photo shoots like bottled water at a health spa. I’d had my fun and experimented with my fair share of mood enhancers. I knew by the second sip of the drink Cosby had given me that I’d been drugged—and drugged good.

My head became woozy, my speech became slurred, and the room began to spin nonstop. Cosby motioned for me to come over to him as though we were really about to act out the scene. He put his hands around my waist, and I managed to put my hand on his shoulder in order to steady myself.

As I felt my body go completely limp, my brain switched into automatic-survival mode. That meant making sure Cosby understood that I knew exactly what was happening at that very moment.

“You are a motherfucker aren’t you?”

That’s the exact question I yelled at him as he stood there holding me, expecting me to bend to his will. I rapidly called him several more “motherfuckers.” By the fifth, I could tell that I was really pissing him off. At one point he dropped his hands from my waist and just stood there looking at me like I’d lost my mind.

What happened next is somewhat cloudy for me because the drug was in fuller play by that time. I recall his seething anger at my tirade and then him grabbing me by my left arm hard and yanking all 110 pounds of me down a bunch of stairs as my high heels clicked and clacked on every step. I feared my neck was going to break with the force he was using to pull me down those stairs.

It was still late afternoon and the sun hadn’t completely gone down yet. When we reached the front door, he pulled me outside of the brownstone and then, with his hand still tightly clenched around my arm, stood in the middle of the street waving down taxis.

When one stopped, Cosby opened the door, shoved me into it and slammed the door behind me without ever saying a word. I somehow managed to tell the driver my address and before blacking out, I looked at the cabbie and asked, as if he knew: “Did I really just call Bill Cosby ‘a motherfucker’?”

Why that was even a concern of mine after what I’d just been through is still a mystery to me? I think my mind refused to process it.

The next day I woke up in my own bed after falling into a deep sleep that lasted most of the day. I had no memory of how I got into my apartment or into my bed, though most likely my doorman helped me out.

I sat in there still stunned by what happened the night before, confused and devastated by the idea that someone I admired so much had tried to take advantage of me, and used drugs to do so. Had I done something to encourage his actions?

Her recount of what he allegedly did afterwards is disheartening to read:

I recall his seething anger at my tirade and then him grabbing me by my left arm hard and yanking all 110 pounds of me down a bunch of stairs as my high heels clicked and clacked on every step. I feared my neck was going to break with the force he was using to pull me down those stairs.

It was still late afternoon and the sun hadn’t completely gone down yet. When we reached the front door, he pulled me outside of the brownstone and then, with his hand still tightly clenched around my arm, stood in the middle of the street waving down taxis.

When one stopped, Cosby opened the door, shoved me into it and slammed the door behind me without ever saying a word. I somehow managed to tell the driver my address and before blacking out, I looked at the cabbie and asked, as if he knew: “Did I really just call Bill Cosby ‘a motherfucker’?”

And she also explains why she waited until now to speak up:

As I wrestled with the idea of telling my story of the day Bill Cosby drugged me with the intention of doing God knows what, the faces of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and countless other brown and black men took residence in my mind.

As if I needed to be reminded. The current plight of the black male was behind my silence when Barbara Bowman came out to tell the horrific details of being drugged and raped by Cosby to the Washington Post in November. And I watched in horror as my longtime friend and fellow model Janice Dickinson was raked over the coals for telling her account of rape at Cosby’s hands. Over the years I’ve met other women who also claim to have been violated by Cosby. Many are still afraid to speak up. I couldn’t sit back and watch the other women be vilified and shamed for something I knew was true.

Check out her essay in its entirety HERE.

 

Photo: Victoria Will/AP Photo

 


Viewing all articles
Browse latest Browse all 20702